Jamaican Holiday

 
 

Everything you need on one album

“Police and Thieves”, and “War Ina Babylon” were my initial points of entry. Still amazing me after nearly four decades.


This side is a Dub sandwich.

The inspirational side

Dr Alimantado’s “I Killed The Barber” is an unhinged masterpiece


The weather’s hot so I’m feeling Reggae. A lot of you probably just thought “Ugh! I HATE that Shit!”, and I can understand why. This compilation was made for you.
When I use the word, I’m thinking of the music I love, most of which was recorded in the 1970’s. Ever since, what passes for music coming out of Jamaica is something else. Even contemporary Reggae trying to sound “vintage” has none of the charm of that original decade.

The ’70’s were an exciting time in Jamaica, the island having attained full independence in 1962, there was a lot of optimism and hope mixed with some harsh reality. About two dozen musicians played on 90% of the records. There were about three rhythm sections and a handful of independent studios full of aspiring singers. Bob Marley among them. Not to mention some truly unique individuals, such as Lee “Scratch” Perry running the boards and making waves still felt today. Origins of DJ culture start here with artists like U-Roy, a local sound system DJ who began “toasting” over dub plates.
Side Two of is The Dub Sandwich.

Jamaican Holiday is the ultimate single cd collection. It has everything from sweet soul music to the deepest, darkest dub.
Give into the heat, move slowly, crack open a cold beverage (warm Red Stripe is terrible), and enjoy your Jamaican Holiday, wherever you are.
The doctor (Dr Alimantado) also recommends a nice big spliff to seal the deal.

This is soul music of the highest order.

Since all of these songs were originally released as vinyl records, and not a few of them ripped from vinyl by yours truly, this too begins with the “Needle Drop”.

Note: After going to the printer’s two errors were found:
On Side 3 L. Perry should be credited as producer of “To Be A Lover”.
On side 4 Sugar Minott’s name is misspelled.

Art included.

Jamaican Holiday