Acid Washed Weekend

I didn’t buy a copy of the original double lp”Nuggets” as compiled by Lenny Kaye in 1972.
I never really sought this stuff out before getting Bowie’s “Pinups” in 1973. At first I preferred his versions because the sound was so much better. I thought the Kink’s original “Where Have All The Goodtimes Gone?” sounded weak and thin by comparison. On the other hand, Syd’s “See Emily Play” had something that Bowie’s did not.

Neither of those are here, however.

Only “Lies”, “Open My Eyes”, and “Farmer John” appeared on the original 1972 “Nuggets”.
The rest are from the much expanded Rhino versions, and a few from various other sources.
I included the best, and most obscure songs I know, while mostly avoiding the usual suspects.
While I’m sure some of this is familiar territory, I hope it’s the surprises that really get you.

Enjoy your trip!

-BBJ

Acid Washed Weekend

The Road To Ruined

I approach singer/songwriters with caution. It can be a rabbit hole of disfunction with boring musical accompaniment. Mix that with Jazz and I really worry.
Maybe because John Martyn’s “Solid Air” is both, and works so beautifully is why it’s been one of my very favorite albums for over 40 years.
It was the first record I played on my first real stereo system, which I bought by working as a busboy at a Marie Callender’s in 1974.
When I was putting this together, I couldn’t bring myself to interupt it’s flow, so tracks 7-15 are 1973′s “Solid Air”. The first six come from “The Tumbler” (1968), “Stormbringer!”(1970)*, “The Road To Ruin”(1970)*, “Bless The Weather”(1971), and the last eight are mostly from “Sunday’s Child”(1975), with the final song taken from “One World”(1977).
He was an incredible guitar player, fantastic singer, and songwriter.

But he had no shortage of demons. I hear many of his love songs as heartfelt apologies for bad behavior.
That’s why they ring so true.

In the ’80′s he morphed from underground folk artist into adult contemporary soft jazz blandness.
And then proceeded to gain about 300 lbs.

I’d Rather Be The Devil

The Act You’ve Known For All These Years

This has been a popular idea for some time.
I first encountered it in the ’70′s when critic Robert Hilburn suggested in the LA Times that although they’d broken up, you could assemble virtual albums from their solo work.
This can be done for every year they all made albums.
The first possibility is most interesting to me.
Almost all of these songs, except for the selections from “Plastic Ono Band” (which include Ringo), were at least written while they were still a band, if not rehearsed during “Let It Be”.

 

It’s clear they were all moving in different directions, but that was also apparent on “The White Album”.

Enjoy!

-BBJ

Beatles ’70

Here Comes The SUN

If Elvis is Jesus then Sam Phillips is GOD. I’ve read Peter Guralnick’s terrific two volume biography of Elvis, as well as “Lost Highway: Journeys and Arrivals of American Musicians”, so I look forward to his latest, “Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock N Roll”.

All the songs on this collection come from the accompanying 2 CD set curated by the author.
I don’t have a single argument with his selections. These are my favorites sequenced by me.
Everybody should stop off in Memphis on their way to New Orleans. When I had to pick one or the other I chose Nashville, and I don’t regret it, but next time will be Memphis.
In the ’80′s I had a friend working in a record store who routinely sold me fancy imports at her employee discount. I discovered SUN through Charly Records, and their top-shelf reissues. They all look and sound great. I still have a lot of them including a 9 record set of SUN Blues.

I dug the brief post- punk Rockabilly revival of 1980 (culminating with “Crazy Little Thing Called Love), and even formed a band with a childhood buddy which went on without me to get a record deal and everything(Jimmy And The Mustangs).

I know all these songs like I wrote and played them myself and you should too.
The music speaks for itself. Regardless of the weather have a SUNny weekend!

Here Comes The Sun

A Saucerful Of Tears

Five guys, one bike.

Pink Floyd’s sophomore effort could very well be the worst of all time. Syd Barrett, their guiding light, and principal songwriter, became the goose that laid the golden eggs, and infamously flamed out, leaving them at the apex and in the middle of recording. I don’t think it was just acid, or insanity. I think forming a band was fun, but it suddenly becoming a vocation, and pop stardom stopped being so. He really wanted to be a painter, and he was a pretty good one from what I’ve seen.

Anyway the rest of the band found themselves in quite the pickle with an album begun and no songs. The title track can only be described as a composition, as it’s not a song or even music,really, except for the last section by Richard Wright, which I’ve used as a long intro to “See Saw”. My band, The Smoove Sailors write more interesting “jams” every week than the title tune.

I’ve been thinking about fixing A Saucerful Of Secrets for a long time. It was the unlistenable half of A Nice Pair, and just as bad as Ummagumma (The best part of which is the picture of all the gear on the back). A Saucerful of Tears is almost long enough to be a double album. Like if the White album lost “Revolution 9″ and “Goodnight”, which I would never miss.

It’s the most democratic Floyd album as it features at least four songwriters and five singers.

I’ve compiled all the Syd Barrett songs recorded after their debut, Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, including the still unreleased “Vegetable Man”, and “Scream Thy Last Scream”, plus a couple singles with David Gilmour from the same period, but not on the album.

“Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Sun” is not my favorite, but is the only one involving all five members. “A Jolly Bunch of Pop Tunes” Syd might say.

I think it plays rather well, and because it’s all from the same period, could have been released this way. Enjoy!

Rehearsing for “The Wall”

 

A Saucerful Of Tears

There and Back Again

Going (Down The Road Feeling) Good

Here is a mix of quirky, atmospheric, and mostly upbeat instrumentals for barreling down the highway and enjoying the open road.

And get home safe

http://www34.zippyshare.com/v/99593151/file.html

Foglizard

 
 
 
 
 
(our only cover)

The “Hits”, Instrumentals, and “B sides”

This couch came with the space where a lot of this material was recorded. It didn’t fit there.

You are forgiven for not knowing Foglizard. While we never played a live show, all the recordings featured here were performed live in the studio in one or two takes. The only overdubs were vocals added later. This is raw Rock N Roll of the highest order.

We began in 1999 as Friends Of Harry, named after my cat (now deceased). We were an improvisational electro-acoustic ensemble with only two rules: No blues, and no drums. We’d all been in plenty of rock bands and were determined not to go there until late 2002, when our bass player, Sharky Tao Mao, booked a nonexistent band named Chariot! to perform as Cheap Trick at Uncle Joe’s (local dive, now demolished) annual Halloween bash. We didn’t learn any Cheap Trick songs except the chorus to “Dream Police” which we tacked onto our signature song, “Chariot”. We wrote 6 originals over two weeks while preparing for the show, but we didn’t really have a singer or lyrics yet. Our songs were instrumentals with minimal words and nonsense syllables.
We had such a good time that Chariot! became a lot more than a side project. D-Lux, a founding Friends Of Harry member, was on an extended vacation in Ecuador while all of this went down and returned to find out he was our new singer. We recorded a self titled album, available here, and played a handful of gigs. D-Lux left town shortly after. For awhile he continued to add lyrics and vocals from a distance, but it soon became clear that we needed a singer who lived in town. Instead of finding one we began to write and record the vocals ourselves with occasional guests.
We realized that there was already too many “Chariots”, so we changed our name to Foglizard. Run a search, we’re at the top of the list.
One thing we learned from our Chariot! experience was that we got really tired of rehearsing our set. We usually ran it as a 45 minute suite with no spaces between songs. It was hard to introduce new material that way. Sharkey was at the point of mutiny.
As a result, Foglizard never rehearsed a set. Every time we came into the studio we’d lay down a new track, usually in one or two takes. At a later session we’d write the lyrics and overdub vocals. The Instrumental disc is mostly material we never got around to “finishing”.
About half the time I’d bring something I was working on into the session. I did this because Beast(baritone guitar, vocals), Q(drums, vocals), and Sharky(bass, vocals) are much better musicians than me, and it was my way of holding down my end. It’s from being self taught, since I didn’t know how to play anything, I make stuff up. Beast, on the other hand, is a Berklee grad who can play the shit out of his guitar, and as far as I can tell, pretty much anything I’ve seen him pick up. Q is rock solid in every way, and Sharkey is the perpetual wild card. He’s always solving problems in unexpected ways.
I’m Buzz Baby Jesus, the other guitar and occasional vocalist.

In 2008, Q began his journey into domesticity and as we saw less of him, Sharkey, Beast, and me developed a side project, The Smoove Sailor’s. When Q announced his retirement in 2010, it became our primary focus. However, we all left the door open and manage to get together as Foglizard about once a year to find out we still “have it”.
In addition to the original players, The Smoove Sailor’s have added several more members, and occasionally play live, but we don’t like rehearsing a set any more than we used to. We split our time between improvisation and the usual “two take wonders” a la Foglizard.

Useless Records is proud to release what I’ve compiled as the “best of” Foglizard on 3 cd’s. Disc one is the “Hits”, disc two are Instrumentals, and disc three is the “Boner” disc of “B” sides and songs that narrowly missed inclusion on disc one.

Here’s a video of “Von Douche”, which has over 14,000 hits thanks in part to it’s link to “Hot Chicks With Douchebags”. It’s the rare case where I sing verses I wrote, and whistle a “solo”.

Disc One Vox
Disc Two Instrumental
Disc Three Boner

Jamaican Holiday Extended

 
(Israelites)
 
(Sugar,Sugar)

Sometimes it takes two.




The “Scratch” side.


Because it’s hot as hell and one “Jamaican Holiday” isn’t enough.

Volume 2

Jamaican Holiday

 
 

Everything you need on one album

“Police and Thieves”, and “War Ina Babylon” were my initial points of entry. Still amazing me after nearly four decades.


This side is a Dub sandwich.

The inspirational side

Dr Alimantado’s “I Killed The Barber” is an unhinged masterpiece


The weather’s hot so I’m feeling Reggae. A lot of you probably just thought “Ugh! I HATE that Shit!”, and I can understand why. This compilation was made for you.
When I use the word, I’m thinking of the music I love, most of which was recorded in the 1970′s. Ever since, what passes for music coming out of Jamaica is something else. Even contemporary Reggae trying to sound “vintage” has none of the charm of that original decade.

The ’70′s were an exciting time in Jamaica, the island having attained full independence in 1962, there was a lot of optimism and hope mixed with some harsh reality. About two dozen musicians played on 90% of the records. There were about three rhythm sections and a handful of independent studios full of aspiring singers. Bob Marley among them. Not to mention some truly unique individuals, such as Lee “Scratch” Perry running the boards and making waves still felt today. Origins of DJ culture start here with artists like U-Roy, a local sound system DJ who began “toasting” over dub plates.
Side Two of is The Dub Sandwich.

Jamaican Holiday is the ultimate single cd collection. It has everything from sweet soul music to the deepest, darkest dub.
Give into the heat, move slowly, crack open a cold beverage (warm Red Stripe is terrible), and enjoy your Jamaican Holiday, wherever you are.
The doctor (Dr Alimantado) also recommends a nice big spliff to seal the deal.

This is soul music of the highest order.

Since all of these songs were originally released as vinyl records, and not a few of them ripped from vinyl by yours truly, this too begins with the “Needle Drop”.

Note: After going to the printer’s two errors were found:
On Side 3 L. Perry should be credited as producer of “To Be A Lover”.
On side 4 Sugar Minott’s name is misspelled.

Art included.

Jamaican Holiday

Now That’s What I Call Bullshit 60

 
(Dion-”Now”)

All Killer No Filler!!


If I was in control of a radio station, let’s call it WBBJ(W-Buzz-Baby-Jesus), my playlist would be based on Duke Ellington’s concept of “There are two kinds of music. Good music, and the other kind”.

They all begin with the “needle drop”. This sound inspires delicious anticipation. I salivate when I hear it. Apparently the ancient Greeks used a bit of cacophony to start a performance, as it defined the silence immediately after. This particular needle drop is “The Night Tripper” by Dr. John. A record I found on the street in Soho.

2- “Campesina” by Spiteri, from 1973. Led by Venezuelan brothers, Charlie and George, Spiteri was released in England as an answer to Santana.
It never charted anywhere, and they didn’t make any more albums. And so this one gem makes its mark in history as a collectors’ ‘must have’ and an album that could have been…. but never was. Still, never too late to enjoy it! I don’t always know where I found something, but in this case it’s here.

3- “What’s Right” by David Werner from his eponymous 1979 album. It’s brilliant, and actually made the charts. Song writer, recording artist, and record producer, he is also known for his two RCA glam rock releases “Whizz Kid” and “Imagination Quota”. All are worth checking out.

4- “Dirty Boys” is my favorite from David Bowie’s latest, “The Next Day”. (2013)

5- “Don’t Swallow The Cap” by The National. I read a great review of this album in the NYTimes. Reminds me of ’80′s Bowie. The jury’s still out, but I like this song. (2013)

6- “Now” – Dion and The Wanderers. From his late ’60′s album “Wonder Where I’m Bound”, which no one bought, this song is powerfully good. With it’s kind of California folk-rock arrangement, it doesn’t sound a thing like “Runaround Sue” or any of his other hits. One thing for sure, the man can sing. (1968)

7- “Ride Your Pony” – Lee Dorsey. I chose this over “Working In A Coal Mine”. (1966)

8- “The World Is A Ghetto” – War. I like to include a couple actual hits in the mix. The context elevates the more obscure tunes. That they hold their own is evidence that the biggest reason they didn’t chart has more to do with luck than quality. (1973)

9- “Walking The Whippet” – Andy Mackay from his 1974 album, “In Search Of Eddie Riff”. With a nod to “Telstar”, this instrumental features Phil Manzanera, and is pretty much Roxy Music without a singer.

10- “Jungle Lullabye” – CW Stoneking from his 2008 album “Jungle Blues”. This Australian singer songwriter guitar banjo player manages to evoke 1920′s music without sounding like a museum. This song is a favorite around my house. Great arrangement by the Primitive Horn Orchestra.

11- “Blue Monk” Original founding members of NRBQ, Terry Adams and Steve Ferguson from “Louisville Sluggers” (2006). Thoroughly affectionate and charming cover of Monk’s tune.

12- “The “In” Crowd” by Dobie Gray is just cool. (1964)

13- “Stop Me, Citate Me” By The Fraternity Of Man, best known for “Don’t Bogart Me” from “Easy Rider” Its original members included three musicians from Lowell George’s band The Factory – Richie Hayward later of Little Feat, Warren Klein, and Martin Kibbee. This countrified psychedelic artifact tells a familiar tale with humor without being a novelty. (1968)

14- “Melody” Formed in 1990, Custard is an indie rock band from Brisbane, Australia. Working similar territory as XTC, they wrote short snappy pop songs with elements of rock n roll and the occasional pedal steel. “Melody” will stick in your head.

15- “Make Me Smile (Come Up And See Me)” by Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel for the album “The Best Years of Our Lives”. Somehow I missed this when it came out in 1975. Infectious as hell, it reminds me of Eno at his glam-poppy best.

16- “Sad Is The Way That I Feel” Mark Eric (1969). Really obscure slab of Beach Boy homage. On a side note, Eric was also a teen actor, appearing on The Partridge Family, among other TV shows of the 60s.

17- “Shelby GT 356″ The Chesterfield Kings. From their foray into surf music “Surfin’ Rampage” (1997). This Rochester NY institution has been exploring various forms of rock music since the 1980′s. They get all the details right, down to their outfits.

18- “Muswell Hillbilly” Southern Culture On The Skids take on The Kinks classic. I’ve been a Kinks fan since “You Really Got Me”, and I can be pretty hard to please, but I think they get all the important things right on this. The rest of the album “Countrypolitan Favorites” (2007) is just as good.

19- “Be My Guest” Neil Finn From “The Kitchen Sink”, a collection of rareties and demos. (2004)

20- “Car Song (Non-Album Track)” Fresh Maggots (1971). Impossibly obscure bit of early ’70′s British folk. This catchy tune is more fun than anything else on the album.

21- “Freddie’s Dead” Curtis Mayfield, 1972. Another actual hit. The single was released before the Super Fly album, and in fact before the film itself was in theaters. It peaked at #4 on the U.S. Pop Chart and #2 on the R&B chart.

22- “Played The Game Too Long” The Original Texas Playboys Under The Direction Of Leon McAuliffe(1979). I found this vinyl rip over at Willard’s.

Special Thanks to TWILIGHTZONE! and Willard’s Wormholes

Art Included.

Now………….60