Vegetable Man

 
 
 
 
 
 

Same photo session as the back of "Barrett" 1970

Same photo session as the back of "Barrett" 1970

So much has already been written about Syd Barrett and Pink Floyd that I don’t think I can really add any new insight.
Like everyone else in 1973 I was enthralled by Dark Side Of The Moon. It was some of the first music after the Beatles broke up that seemed to carry on their tradition of innovation and solid studio craftsmanship.

In many ways I liked the follow-up, Wish You Were Here, even better. It was my favorite album to play at low volume and fall asleep to in my San Diego State dorm room during the 1976-77 school year. I used to spend a ridiculous amount of time in record stores wishing I had more money. I collected a handful of Pink Floyd albums. A lot of them were pretty bad. The best part of UmmaGumma was the picture on the cover of all their gear. (I thought their movie filmed in Pompeii was a frightening bore). I liked Relics, mostly because I was charmed by “Bike”, even though it bore no resemblance to Dark Side Of The Moon. I became aware that there was an apparently brilliant former member by the name of Syd Barrett. I found out that Wish You Were Here was apparently about him. I bought the double album containing Barrett, and The Madcap Laughs both of his studio albums, re-released on Harvest in 1974, due to the enormous popularity of his former band.

The first time I played it I was put-off by the crudeness of the music. The lyric I heard as “Ice cream Baby, I seen you looking good the other evening” stuck in my craw. The music sounded like it was made by a crazy person, which was disturbing.
For some reason I taped the whole thing before I warped the records over a hot plate and returned them to The Wherehouse(record chain). I don’t remember what I exchanged it for, but I’m sure it was something worse, that at the time, seemed better.
I’d play the tape for friends as a curiosity, introducing it as “This guy founded Pink Floyd, went crazy, made this music and disappeared”. Each time I’d let it play a little longer, and pretty soon I was hooked. Some of it was, and is, pretty painful listening, hearing the struggle to get those songs on tape. Still there was something so compelling that Syd has, to this day, never left my playlist.

From the "Madcap Laughs" session 1969

From the "Madcap Laughs" session 1969

What I’ve collected here are some of the more obscure gems. “Vegetable Man”, and “Scream Thy Last Scream”, are some of the last attempts at coming up with a hit single, in the wake of “See Emily Play” that Syd wrote before being booted out of the band. For some reason they are not included in the newish 3 cd re-release of Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, the first album by Pink Floyd, and the only one featuring Syd as a leader. The story I’ve heard about “Vegetable Man” is that Syd was picked up and taken to the studio, where there was enormous pressure on him to come up with another hit. The lyrics are a catalog of what he was wearing at the time. It was rejected by the label, as was “Scream”. “Lucy Leave” and “King Bee” are acetates recorded as demos in 1965, and why they only appeared recently I chalk up to the information age we are living in. I have the files, but I’m not sure of their origin. These days the difference between unreleased and released is a pretty porous border. “Two of a Kind” was recorded for the John Peel Show, and “Bob Dylan Blues” is from a recent compilation, originally from a cassette owned by David Gilmour.

Here’s the connection I’ll make that I haven’t seen before:
While on their disastrous, and abbreviated US tour, Syd got a haircut from Vidal Sassoon in New York which he hated. This is the haircut that “looks so bad” in “Vegetable Man”.
Here can be seen said haircut in a promotional video made for “Jug Band Blues”,
Syd’s last contribution to a Pink Floyd album.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTtXVrANEhU

Syd, "Wish You Were Here Sessions" July, 1975

Syd, "Wish You Were Here Sessions" July, 1975

wiki
Barrett had one noted reunion with the members of Pink Floyd, which occurred in 1975 during the recording sessions for Wish You Were Here. He attended the Abbey Road session unannounced, and watched the band record “Shine On You Crazy Diamond” — a song that happened to be about Barrett. By that time, he had become quite overweight, had shaved off all of his hair (including his eyebrows), and his ex-bandmates did not at first recognize him. Eventually, they realized who he was and Roger Waters was so distressed that he was brought to tears. Barrett’s behavior at the session was erratic, and he spent part of the session trying to brush his teeth by keeping the brush still and jumping up and down. Roger finally managed to ask him what he thought of the song, and he simply said “sounds a bit old” and walked out of the studio. This would be the last time any member of Pink Floyd would ever see him. There is a reflection on the entire day in Nick Mason’s book Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd. A reference to this reunion also appears in the film The Wall, where the character Pink, played by Bob Geldof, shaves off all of his body hair after having a mental breakdown, just as Barrett had.

Vegetable Man
Scream Thy Last Scream
Lucy Leave
King Bee
Two Of A Kind
Bob Dylan Blues

Kaleidoscope/Fairfield Parlour

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

One of my favorite things about being alive is discovering great music. I’ve been into it for so long I’m always surprised when I find something that’s been around awhile and has somehow eluded me. Kaleidoscope caught me completely off guard. It’s crazy that music this good could remain so obscure. All of their albums are well worth hearing. Recently, while I was painting a picture, I had them all on my mp3 player and listened non-stop for a week.

First album (1967)

First album (1967)

The English band KALEIDOSCOPE (not to be confused with American band KALEIDOSCOPE which existed at the same time, played basically psychedelic rock too, and were also ignored by the public) is an almost forgotten band from the late sixties and early seventies.
In 1967 they released Tangerine Dream. The album comprises fine psychedelic songs with experimentations and arrangements like many of the top psychedelic and early progressive bands from that age (THE BEATLES, PINK FLOYD, THE MOODY BLUES). They got lots of airplay and recorded many BBC sessions, but didn´t sell well. They eventually released more singles, like ‘Jenny Artichoke’, which was a success, but sold poorly, and another album, Faintly Blowing. It was released in 1969, showing a progression of it’s predecessor in terms of sound. Although still psychedelic, the compositions were getting more progressive. The album unfortunately failed to chart.

2nd album (1969)

2nd album (1969)

They released a final single, ‘Balloon’, before changing the name to FAIRFIELD PARLOUR and becoming totally progressive oriented. The band didn’t achieve success and they were unlucky at the time, failing to chart and having problems (including some sabotage) in all great gigs they had, including the famous Isle of Wight, which they were the responsible for the ‘Theme Song’ of the festival (released under the name of I LUV WIGHT).

Fairfield Parlour – “From Home To Home” (1970) was released to the same indifference as the others. For some reason there is no mention of it in the prog archives article I lifted. (Sorry the writing’s so bad, even after I practically re-wrote it)-Ed

WHITE FACED LADY was their last album, recorded in 1971 partly with the help of Mike Pinder, from THE MOODY BLUES. The album was a conceptual double-album with many orchestral arrangements. The band had a deal with Vertigo at that time, but they were dropped and moved to CBS, who refused to release it. It stayed shelved for twenty years, until 1991, when Kaleidoscope Records, a label created just to release the album, put it out under the name of KALEIDOSCOPE, although actually recorded by FAIRFIELD PARLOUR. The band split in 1972 due to the lack of success (they were offered less than 20 dollars to play the last gigs). So ended the career of a great psychedelic and progressive rock band which had the talent to be one of the major progressive rock acts of their age. Sometimes bad luck is all it takes. Kaleidoscope was even more unlucky than Big Star.

Last album (recorded 1971, released 1991)

Last album (recorded 1971, released 1991)

3rd album (1970)

3rd album (1970)

Dive Into Yesterday
Faintly Blowing
In My Box
A Story From Tom Bitz
Standing
If So You Wish
Sunny Side Circus
Epitaph-Angel

Tabby’s Blues Box

 
 

This might be where we were

This might be where we were

My Dad dumped my mom so after the divorce she decided to move to Panama City, Florida, to get away from all the pain that California had to offer. Her brother and a lot of his kids, and her sister lived there so it seemed like a good idea.
I really wanted to move to New York City and figured anywhere on the East Coast was closer, so I took the opportunity to go along.
In June of 1986 we hired my friend DV to help move all our stuff from Huntington Beach. We loaded up the 24 foot Ryder truck and dragged my Honda Civic behind all the way to Florida in 3 days. We drove for 48 straight hours of sleep deprived halucinations. Texas, which is really wide took what seemed like forever to cross. Falling asleep at the wheel was a constant problem, you don’t know how bad it is until you’ve almost killed yourself.

Because we couldn’t ever see the car we were towing, driving in reverse was something we didn’t want to experience. We were driving through Baton Rouge when we saw a Red Roof Inn right on the highway that looked like we could pull into and out of without too much trouble, so we went for it. We checked in and I was ready to fall asleep the minute I lay on the bed when DV insisted that we had to make a pilgrmiage to Tabby’s Blues Box, a club featured on a public television special called Rainin’ in My Heart. Before I knew it he was on the phone talking to the club and they were open.

DV can tell the rest. (This is from the comments section of A Ass Pocket Of Whiskey post)

Reminds me of a cab ride in Baton Rouge, La. one night after driving for 48 hours straight from California. You and me, jumpin’ out of our truck and into a cab, tellin’ the driver the address of the now defunkt Tabby’s Blues Box. We were on a mission. When we arrived to this venue without even a sign on the front and in not such a good part of town. Night had fallen hard and our African American driver turns his head around and says “Are you sure you guys wanna go in there? I don’t think I would go in there!” “Oh yeah, we’re sure!” We jumped out and thanked our good natured driver who stood by for a minute, watching us to see if we were gonna stay. We moved toward the door of the “club”. Someone sitting at a folding card table just inside charged us what might have been two dollars. We entered the room that was lit with a single red light bulb where a few scattered patrons (maybe eight people)averted their gaze in our direction. To the left was this old black guy with a silver Hard Hat on, playing a beat up old guitar. He sounded like blood, mud & magic. Ahead of us was the tiny makeshift bar…we both simultaneously decided that if we were to get murdered in this place that it would be well worth it. We proceed to head straight for the whiskey. The musician, we found out, was Silas Hogan. He was everything we were looking for in this possible misadventure. It was great talking to him after he finished. We got him to autograph the singles we bought of his tune “Hairy Leg Women” that he was hocking from a small suitcase. He was the real deal. We bought him some grapefruit juice and we all raised our drinks and said cheers. We did die that night, and wound up in blues heaven.

Actually he was wearing a Train Conductor's hat

Actually he was wearing a Train Conductor's hat

That was such a powerful night. I felt like I was Gumby walking into a book about the history of the blues. Everything was hyper vivid. We were exhausted but we knew what we had to do. On our third wind and three sheet to the wind as well. I think you got me on the selling records from the guitar case deal. And here I thought my brain was still functioning. Nothing like a rented moving truck with pink flamingos tied to the vertical curb feelers and three thousand miles of road in your face.
My reply:
I still have my autographed copy of “Hairy Leg Woman” b/w “Bad Little Puppy”, and will post it sometime soon. When I do I’ll just use your comment for text, as your memory needs no correcting, although I thought the singles came out of his guitar case.
And you forgot to mention our cabbie gave me a card with a phone number for the cab company. I called, it was after 2 am, and we got the same driver. We were pretty lit and told him what a great party they had going there.
(The next day we drove to Panama City)

Tabby's #2

Tabby's #2

Tabby’s Blues Box and Heritage Hall opened its doors in 1979 as the first and only blues club in Baton Rouge. It featured authentic blues music, offered the original blues “jam,” and welcomed fans from all over the world. The Thursday night Hoo Doo Party was a favorite with college students.

Famous local musicians — Henry Gray, Silas Hogan, Raful Neal — could be found playing there when they were in town. Tabby’s son and Grammy Award winner, Chris Thomas King, got his start there and signed his first recording contract in the Blues Box. The “Box” was visited by many famous people: Mike Tyson, Paul Newman, Bruce Springsteen and Shaquille O’Neal were just a few.

In 1999, the North Blvd. railroad overpass project caused the demolition of the original location and a new location was found on Lafayette St. in downtown Baton Rouge. The new “Box” opened in 2000 and stayed open until 2004 when Tabby had a massive stroke while waiting to go onstage.

Tabby Thomas was a great host, too.

Tabby Thomas was a great host, too.

Hairy Leg Woman
Bad Little Puppy

A Ass Pocket Of Whiskey

 

a ass pocket of whiskey

A Ass Pocket of Whiskey is a collaborative album by the American Delta bluesman R. L. Burnside and the American punk blues band Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, released on Matador Records on 18 June 1996. The style might be described as lo-fi storytelling garage punk-blues rock with explicit lyrics.

Whatever it is rocks like a mutha. R. L. kills it. Jon Spencer’s got it. Let the music do the talking. Play Loud

He Rocks

He Rocks

R. L. Burnside (November 23, 1926 – September 1, 2005), born Robert Lee Burnside, was a North Mississippi hill country blues singer, songwriter, and guitarist who lived much of his life in and around Holly Springs, Mississippi. He played music for much of his life, but did not receive much attention until the early 1990s. In the latter half of the 1990s, Burnside repeatedly recorded with Jon Spencer, garnering crossover appeal and introducing his music to a new fanbase within the underground punk blues music scene.

The Criminal Inside Me

Monk Mystery

 
Not entirely solo

Not entirely solo

Okay you geeks, what tune is this?
I bought this Solo Monk cd in the early ’90’s. It’s supposed to contain 13 solo piano tunes. While there is no mention of a bonus track, it nevertheless has one, even though it’s not at the end. The extra track isn’t solo, but a trio. I just ripped it off the disc and it comes up as “Solo Monk” with the album art and all. Track 14 is solo and comes up as Unknown Artist. The Mystery tune is #13 and listed as “Introspection[+]”. Is that right??
I guess whoever mastered it at Columbia f*&%ed up.
According to Amazon the latest edition has more songs on it than mine, but none are the version of “Introspection”(?) posted here.

Captain Beefheart, (Don Van Vliet,) describes the most memorable performance he ever witnessed.

“I saw Monk once at a theatre in San Fernando Valley. They gave him a grand piano, a really beautiful Steinway, with a cut glass bowl of roses. He came in late wearing a trench coat. He dumped the bowl in the piano, knocked down the lid, and hit one note. The sound: everything going into the piano, the strings, the water splashing, the roses. And then he left.”

Monk Mystery

Cow Cow Boogie

 
 

Peace, Baby

Peace, Baby

I’ve always loved this song. My parents played a lot of records. My Dad used to buy weird cut-outs, mostly by names he knew already, such as Chet Atkins, Doc Severinson, people of the previous era trying to make records in the swingin sixties. A lot of potential for uncool there. One record they played a lot was a Capitol Records something or other anniversary compilation of big hits. Cow Cow Boogie was the opener, being the fledgling label’s first gold record. When I was in High School I snickered every time Ella sang the lyric with “loco weed” in it (Still do, actually). Check out the ultra cool jive rap with Don Raye on The House Of Blue Lights. She actually calls him “Homey”.

Ella Mae Morse (September 12, 1924 – October 16, 1999), was an American popular singer. One of the most talented and overlooked vocalists of the 1940s, Morse blended jazz, country, pop, and R&B; at times she came remarkably close to what would be known as rock and roll.

She was all that

She was all that

Morse was born in Mansfield, Texas. She was hired by Jimmy Dorsey when she was 14 years old. Dorsey believed she was 19, and when he was informed by the school board that he was now responsible for her care, he fired her. In 1942, at the age of 17, she joined Freddie Slack’s band, with whom in the same year she recorded Cow Cow Boogie, Capitol Records’ first gold single. “Mr. Five by Five” was also recorded by Morse with Slack and they had a hit recording with the song in 1942 (Capitol 115). She also originated the wartime hit “Milkman, Keep Those Bottles Quiet,” which was later popularized by Nancy Walker in the film, Broadway Rhythm.

Ella_Mae_Morse_In_A_Jazz_Recording_Session

Cow Cow Boogie
The House Of Blue Lights

Twang

 
Home of Twang

Home of Twang

I love this song. The rest of the album is pretty much Jazz, but this is something altogether different. It is nothing but music of the highest, most transcendent order. Bill Frisell kills on acoustic guitar, and it is a distinct pleasure just listening to the rhythm section of Charlie Haden and Joey Baron. Horns are Randy Brecker, John Clark, and Jim Pugh. Astonishing music.

John Scofield (born December 26, 1951 in Dayton, Ohio), often referred to as “Sco,” is an American jazz guitarist and composer, who has played and collaborated with Miles Davis, Joe Henderson, Charles Mingus, Joey Defrancesco, Herbie Hancock, Pat Metheny, Bill Frisell, Pat Martino, Mavis Staples, Phil Lesh, Billy Cobham, Medeski Martin & Wood, George Duke, Jaco Pastorius, and many other important artists. At ease in the bebop idiom, Scofield is also well versed in jazz fusion, funk, blues, soul, and other forms of modern American music.

Early in his life, Scofield’s family left Ohio and relocated to the small, then mostly rural location of Wilton, Connecticut; it was here that he discovered his interest in music.

In 1992, Scofield released Grace Under Pressure, featuring fellow guitarist Bill Frisell, with Charlie Haden on bass and Joey Baron on drums.

Twang

Okkervil River-The Stand Ins

 
 
 
 

Indie Band Hits Home Run

Indie Band Hits Home Run

So far this blog has mostly dug up older music you might have missed. There is, as always, a lot of great new music out there. Okkervil River’s The Stand Ins is an album worth hearing from last year, and is a classic example of an indie record achieving greatness. Most of the time the difference between “indie” and “classic” boils down to production values. They sound indie because they sound cheap, and they were. When a band transcends their station and creates work that can stand up there with the big boys, it’s really an accomplishment worth applauding. Most of the time it’s that one album when the planets were aligned, everything came together, and the results surprised everybody. These are the records that never leave my playlist.
I think the Stand Ins will turn out to be one of those. Based on the fact that it survived whatever hype and still sounds good in 2009, I think it will still sound good in 2018.
Because I’m old, it reminds me most of Lola era Kinks, if I were younger, I’d mention the Smiths, and a lot younger, Arcade Fire, but I really don’t like referencing other artists as a comparison because so often it’s not helpful, or fair to the artists.
Using a broad pallette of instruments, Okkervil River have a bright, folk rocky, sound all their own. Will Sheff’s songwriting is first rate. A world class act that will be hard to follow.

Minus the yard gnome, on tour in Wisconsin

Minus the yard gnome, on tour in Wisconsin


wiki

Okkervil River is an indie rock band from Austin, Texas. Formed in 1998, the band takes its name from a short story by Russian author Tatyana Tolstaya. They self-released their first album, Stars Too Small to Use, which led them to the South by Southwest music festival. After recording their first album in a garage, they signed with Jagjaguwar. Okkervil River continued by releasing four more albums, including critically lauded concept album Black Sheep Boy.

After a period of touring for Black Sheep Boy, Okkervil River followed up with The Stage Names. The album sold 10,000 in its opening week in the United States. The group released a free covers album, Golden Opportunities Mixtape from their live performances.

The band has garnered positive critical reception. Especially noted are each song’s lyrics, intricate instrumentation, and thematic albums. In addition, they were recently featured on the talk show Late Night with Conan O’Brien and have performed with high profile bands such as The Decemberists, The New Pornographers, and Lou Reed.

Okkervil River released their most recent album The Stand Ins on September 9th, 2008. They are promoting the release with a series of cover songs from the album on YouTube by people they’ve met as a band.

Okkervil River’s founding members became friends in high school in Meriden, New Hampshire, and after parting ways for college moved to Austin, Texas to live together and start a band. The band consisted of singer-songwriter Will Sheff, Zach Thomas on bass and mandolin, and Seth Warren on drums. Their first gig was at Steamboat in Austin on January 11, 1999.

On April 17, 2006, Okkervil River signed with Virgin/EMI in Europe. The label re-released Black Sheep Boy and its follow-up Black Sheep Boy Appendix as a double disc on April 28, 2006. Jagjaguwar eventually followed suit, releasing the Definitive Edition with extra songs and videos.

The Stage Names, their fourth full-length studio album (produced again by Beattie), was released on August 7, 2007. The disc features the solidified line-up that toured extensively on Black Sheep Boy and the Black Sheep Boy Appendix, with Cassidy replacing Draper who joined Shearwater. The album was met with critical acclaim and debuted at number 62 on the Billboard 200 with 10,000 copies sold.

Okkervil River released their fifth album The Stand Ins on September 9th 2008. The album was conceived as a sequel to The Stage Names. The album charted at #42 with 11,000 copies sold, according to the Billboard 200.[8] On December 12, 2007, the band freely released a nine-song mixtape entitled Golden Opportunities Mixtape via their website.[9] These recordings, along with the upcoming appendix, are the first to feature contributions from new touring keyboardist, Justin Sherburn, who joined the band in November 2007.

At a show in Wellington, New Zealand on 5 March 2008 it was announced that guitarist Brian Cassidy would be stepping down from the band as a full-time touring member. Shortly after this on 12 March 2008, it was subsequently announced that Cassidy’s temporary replacement would be Charles Bissell of The Wrens for their spring and summer tours. [10] In the autumn of 2008 Lauren Gurgiolo, singer and songwriter of the Austin, Texas band The Dialtones, joined as a permanent member, playing electric guitar, mandolin and banjo.

On April 21, 2009, the “Pop Lie” single was released backed with the B-Sides “Millionaire” and “Pop Lie (One Man Band Version)”

Singer Songwriter
Blue Tulip
Pop Lie
Calling And Not Calling My Ex

Ruby Don’t Take Your Love To Town/Monster ’69

 
 

I’ve always loved this song. “Ruby” breaks my heart every time. It’s amazing how topical popular music could be. What top ten hit today deals with shattered soldiers returning from an unpopular war in such a frankly disturbing manner?

This downer song was a hit, and still relevant.

This downer song was a hit, and still relevant.

The First Edition (later known as Kenny Rogers and the First Edition) was a country music/rock band stalwart members being Kenny Rogers (vocals & bass guitar), Mickey Jones (drums & percussion) and Terry Williams (guitar & vocals). The band formed in 1967, with noted folk musician Mike Settle (guitar and vocals) and the operatically trained Thelma Camacho completing the lineup.

The First Edition signed with Reprise Records in the summer of 1967 and first hit big in early 1968 with the pop-psychedelic single “Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In)” (US #5). After several hits and misses the group (now billed as “Kenny Rogers and the First Edition”) once again hit the top ten in the summer of 1969 with the topical Ruby, Don’t Take Your Love To Town (US #6, UK#2).

For the next six years, the First Edition bounced between country, pop and mild psychedelia, enjoying worldwide success.

These guys were scary.

These guys were scary.

Steppenwolf’s “Monster_Suicide_America” is 40 years old, but sounds like it was written today.
Except the reality expressed in the song is worse now, making it more like prophecy come true.
Music was an important part of the culture. What has been lost saddens me. Fortunately, the industry as we know it, is dying
a not-so-slow death, so maybe something good will come of the demise.
Meanwhile enjoy the topical tunes. This stuff used to get played on the radio.

Monster is an album by the band Steppenwolf, released in 1969 (see 1969 in music) and was their first LP with new lead guitarist, Larry Byrom instead of Michael Monarch. The album was Steppenwolf’s most political one, making references to important issues at the time, such as the Vietnam War.

The title refers to the contemporary politics and state of the U.S., as in the lyrics to the title song:

“The cities have turned into jungles,
and corruption is stranglin’ the land.
The police force is watching the people,
and the people just can’t understand.
We don’t know how to mind our own business,
’cause the whole world’s got to be just like us.
Now we are fighting a war over there.
No matter who’s the winner, we can’t pay the cost.
‘Cause there’s a monster on the loose,
it’s got our heads into the noose.
And it just sits there… watching.”

The album was the first Steppenwolf album not to feature a US top ten hit, and can thus be seen as the beginning of their slow fall from fame. Even though this album, “Live”, “Steppenwolf 7” and “For Ladies Only” are today seen as making up the latter half of their ultimate prime, their days of “Born to Be Wild”-like fame were over. Still two singles from the album cracked the top 40, and Steppenwolf would continue landing albums in the US top 20 for a while yet, a factor that became more and more important during this time.

As seen above, the title track is a call for pacifism and a more ethical society. The tone, which can be seen as very provocative towards the political decisions of the US at the time, continues with “Draft Resister”, which glorifies draft resisters as heroes.

Ruby Don’t Take Your Love To Town
Kenny Rogers And The First Edition
Monster-America-Suicide
Steppenwolf

Sure Hope You Mean It

 
 

I like this.
Sure Hope You Mean It is an instant classic. Calling is pretty cool, too. I’m a sucker for Sweet Soul Music. It’s finger-poppin’ time!

He's got it

He's got it

wiki
Raphael Saadiq (born Charlie Ray Wiggins May 14, 1966, Oakland, California), is an American singer, songwriter and record producer. Saadiq has been a standard bearer for “old school” R&B since his early days as a member of the multiplatinum group Tony! Toni! Toné! He also produced songs of such artists as Joss Stone, D’Angelo, Mary J. Blige, and John Legend.

Saadiq has been playing the bass guitar since the age of six. He first began singing at age 12 with a group called “The Gospel Humminbirds”. After high school, Saadiq joined Prince and Sheila E. on the Parade Tour.

Saadiq’s latest critically acclaimed album, The Way I See It, released on September 16, 2008, featuring artists Stevie Wonder, Joss Stone and Jay-Z, received three Grammy Award Nominations and voted Best Album on iTunes of 2008.

Sure Hope You Mean It
Calling