In The Court Of The Crimson King

 

Islands cover in England

Islands cover in England

This is King Crimson Live in Detroit, December 13, 1971. It’s the “Islands” incarnation of the band. This is the very beginning of the tour. The truly horrible “Earthbound” was recorded toward the end of the same tour.  About this song, Ian Wallace, the drummer says: “Backstage during the applause for an encore we plotted……sick of having to listen to people shout out “Epitaph” and “In the Court Of The Crimson King”. What you hear is a hilarious and unique version of a familiar song that could be titled, “In The Court of the BB King”. I can’t believe Robert Fripp let this happen.  It might be your only opportunity to hear him play the blues.  It’s worth hearing.

Ian Wallace was lightly edited for space consideration-Ed

Robert and Boz 1971

Robert and Boz 1971

In The Court Of The Crimson King

No Opportunity Necessary

 
I copied this from Wiki.  I’ll add that this is the album opener, and that it was written by Richie Havens.

Time and a Word is the second album by progressive rock band Yes, released in mid-1970 in the UK and November 1970 in the US.

This was the last Yes album to feature the group’s original line-up, as Peter Banks was fired before the album’s release.

With the ambitious decision to use string arrangements on most of the album’s songs, Peter’s role as a guitarist was diminished. Tensions within the band increased, and just after the album’s recording was completed in early 1970, Peter was asked to leave, which he reluctantly did. Steve Howe would join the line-up that March, replacing Banks. The album also includes three songs Jon Anderson wrote with David Foster, a former band mate in The Warriors. The US and UK releases had different album artwork; the UK version had black-and-white drawing of a nude woman, but this was deemed inappropriate in the US, so the cover there showed a picture of the band. Despite appearing on the US cover, Steve Howe does not play on the album. The back cover of both versions features photographs of the band members, including Peter Banks.

Time and a Word’s use of heavy strings seemed intrusive to some critics, and while the album was received in a lukewarm fashion upon its release (UK #45, Yes’ first chart entry at home), it is more warmly remembered today.

With the acquisition of Steve Howe, the band would start to compose, rehearse, and record the music for The Yes Album over the summer and autumn of 1970. The album, released the following spring, would finally earn the band their success. In effect, Time and a Word marks the end of Yes’s formative, yet musically significant, period.

Time and a Word (Atlantic 2400 006) reached #45 in the UK. It never charted in the US.

No Opportunity Necessary

Every Little Thing

 
Another Beatles cover. I can’t say it tops the original, but it’s very big and busy, and is well worth hearing more than once. It’s Yes from their first album “Yes”, released in 1969. Original Guitarist Peter Banks is featured, and does a fine job. Not sure why they kicked him out. He’s about the only member that left and didn’t come back at some point. He started a band called Flash, which sounded identical to Yes, except with the “suck” knob turned way up. Banks also plays on Yes’ second,”Time And A Word”, although Steve Howe is on the cover. Tony Kaye is the keyboard player. With Jon Anderson, Bill Bruford, and Chris Squire.
I can’t remember the last time I heard the original. Obviously I love the Beatles, but I took them off the daily playlist decades ago.

Every Little Thing

Los Straightjackets

 

This is the other Christmas music I didn’t mind hearing all the way through. Los Straightjackets play God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen like Pipeline.
Surf’s Up!  I promise no more Holiday cheer until after Thanksgiving.

God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen

Dona Nobis Pacem

 
I have recently been researching Christmas Music for use in a public space. It’s a long story I’ll get to later. Anyway there is a lot of Holiday music out there, much of it astoundingly bad.
Every once in a while something would come along that was only half bad. This is the only transcendent piece of music I found so it’s worth sharing.
I remembered liking this song as part of a Christmas show when I was in sixth grade chorus. It’s origin is Bach. I found a rendition on an album of funeral songs. The words are latin for “Bring Us Peace”.
This version, by South Africa’s Ladysmith Black Mambazo, the group famously backing Paul Simon on “Graceland”, mangles somewhat the beautiful melody in a surprising, and frankly beatlesque fashion.

Dona Nobis Pacem